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1869 - Gradual Enfranchisement Act extended to require Indian to elect chief and council, but only by male voters and only a male chief, replacing the "irresponsible system" of traditional governance. Legislation passed that a status Indian woman who married a non-Indian man would cease to be an Indian.

"Following Confederation, the Canadian government moved to strengthen the provisions of the Gradual Civilization Act of 1857 in an effort to speed the assimilation of the Native peoples. The Act of 1869 sought to protect the status of reserve lands by further restricting the definition of who was regarded as an Indian. Now, only persons of one quarter Indian blood could be acknowledged as having Indian status. The Act also worked to replace traditional tribal forms of government with administrative provisions more in keeping with English traditions.

 

Canadian Natives expressed their dissatisfaction with the erosion of their traditional rights by largely refusing to participate in the government's plans for citizenship and assimilation. The Act also included provisions that systematically discriminated against Native peoples on the basis of gender since non-Indian women who married Indians acquired Indian status but Indian women who married non-Indian men lost theirs." - CanadianHistory.ca

Digging Deeper

 

A timeline of how the Indian Act grew from the Gradual Civilization Act and the Gradual Enfranchisement Act: Preceden

High School Resources

 

 

Junior High School Resources

 

 

Elementary School Resources

 

 

 

 

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